Can I Collect Both SSDI and Unemployment?

Unfortunately, one of the biggest criticisms we hear about the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program is that it does not give people an incentive to work. Photo of piggy bank

Recently, the Center for American Progress had a report about how cuts to SSDI and unemployment will not help people return to work. Earlier this year, the House passed its 2016 fiscal budget, which eliminates the opportunity for people to receive SSDI and unemployment concurrently. An additional proposal came up in the Senate, but it was not voted on.

The Center for American Progress argued that all this will do is allow families to fall deeper into poverty. It argues that you cannot cut unemployment and SSDI benefits to families, and expect them to immediately return to work. “[Cutting] benefits for Social Security disability insurance beneficiaries who lose a job through no fault of their own and must turn to unemployment insurance to partially replace their lost wages would punish them for attempting to return to work,” the organization reported.

Can I Get SSDI and Unemployment Benefits at the Same Time?

It should be noted that there are contradictions between SSDI and unemployment rules, even if some people receive both forms of income concurrently. In order to receive SSDI, you must prove that you cannot work due to your disability. However, in most states, to receive unemployment benefits, you must prove that you are actively seeking employment. For people who are recently laid off due to a disability or people in the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program, things can become tricky.

Currently, people can earn up to $1,070 per month in wages including unemployment without jeopardizing their eligibility to SSDI benefits. Most people who obtain unemployment benefits earn too much each month to receive SSDI benefits. If you have questions about this, you should speak to a disability attorney.

To read the Center for American Progress report, you can click here.

Who Do I Need an Attorney for SSDI?

This subject is incredibly complex. If you have been laid off due to a disability, you should speak to an attorney about SSDI eligibility. For some people, it is in their best interest to wait until their unemployment benefits run out before applying for SSDI, as these benefits exceed what they would receive from the SSA.

For others, looking for employment in order to maintain their unemployment eligibility can have an impact on their ability to receive SSDI. This is why explaining your situation in detail to a disability attorney is important. Our attorneys can provide you with best course of action to move forward.

Our firm is dedicated to helping people who cannot work obtain assistance. Continue visiting our blog for more information.

Troutman & Troutman, P.C. – Tulsa Social Security disability lawyers

Source: https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/poverty/news/2015/04/14/110961/cutting-social-security-disability-insurance-wont-help-anyone-go-back-to-work/



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